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Top 10 local Black-owned farms that you should support

top-10-localTop 10 local Black-owned farms that you should support

By Black Business.org

There are Black-owned farms all across the country, but according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), they make up only 2 percent of U.S. agricultural land. With these odds, it is very difficult for African Americans and others who want to support Black-owned farms.

To help you find ones that may be located near your home, here is a list of 10 of the top local Black-owned farms:

#1 – Scott Family Farms: this Fresno, Calif. farm specializes in organic produce. It is a family owned business operated by Will Scott Jr. and his family. Their produce includes produce popular among the Black community, such as collard greens, turnip greens, black eyed peas and sweet potatoes.

#2 – East New York Farms: A project of the United Community Centers in partnership with local residents to increase organic food production within the economically disadvantaged community in the eastern part of Brooklyn. Since they began in 1998, they have created 65 community gardens in the area.

#3 – Swanson Family Farm: this 30-acre farm in Hampton, Ga., connects with local farmers to sell their fresh produce, grass-fed beef, chicken, eggs and other farm-fresh pro-ducts to local markets.

#4 – Mill Creek Farm: this educational urban farm in West Philadelphia uses no chemicals in their farming. Their goal is to provide fresh produce, “building a healthy community and environment, and promoting a just and sustainable food system” for residents of West Philadelphia.

#5 – Burnell Farms: Based in Royston, Ga., this farm land is owned by Tammy Jo and Bill Burnell who started the farm “with just $48 in seeds and a little over $1,000 in cash.” The company’s sole purpose is to improve the health of residents in the north Georgia area.

#6 – Metro Atlanta Urban Farm: A certified naturally grown farm and community-driven organization located in College Park, Ga., that produces more than 25 crops, including eight varieties of tomatoes and three varieties of okra. The farm was created to fill a need to pro-vide low-income families and individuals with access to affordable fresh produce.

#7 – Five Seeds Farm: Denzel Mitchell, founder and farm manager, his wife and five children started the farm in 2008 in Baltimore, Md. Their produce is free of synthetic pesticides, herbicides, fungicides and fertilizers, and includes fruit, vegetables, herbs, eggs, honey and animals.

#8 – Bed Stuy Farm Share: A partnership between a local farm and a neighborhood. The farm is located in the New York City area and brings fresh, affordable produce to NYC neighborhoods and residents. It is member-based with members buying a “share” in the farm that enables the farm to purchase certified organic products. Members receive a share of the harvest, and the community benefits from fresh, affordable produce.

#9 – The BLK ProjeK: A South Bronx Mobile Market & Buying Club pilot program started in 2009 by Bronx activist and mother, Tanya Fields who initially just wanted healthier food for herself and her family. Mobile Market brings high quality food from local producers and resells at afford-able prices in the South Bronx area, and includes a buying club that provides a weekly share to residents at a very low price.

#10 – Southeastern African American Farmers Organic Network (SAAFON): This network of Black, organic farmers in Southeastern U.S. They represent Black farmers in eight states: Alabama, Georgia, Florida, Louisiana, Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia and the Virgin Islands.

Their goal is to help sustain agriculture in African American communities.

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    About The Poster

    Carma Lynn Henry Westside Gazette Newspaper 545 N.W. 7th Terrace, Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33311 Office: (954) 525-1489 Fax: (954) 525-1861

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